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in 1963. one of the great heroes of the civil rights movement. myrlie evers-williams will be giving the invocation at the beginning of the ceremonies and then we will see justice sonia sotomayor who is one of the newer associate justices on the supreme court. she will be delivering the oath of office to the vice president. this is beyonce coming in now and we will be hearing from her. there are several musical performances today. after the vice president is sworn in, james taylor will be singing "america the beautiful." then following that, john roberts, jr., the chief justice of the united states will administer the oath of office to the president. we just saw 88-year-old jimmy carter arriving on the scene. former presidents are almost always in attendance at these events, but today, george herbert walker bush and his son, george w. bush are not in attendance. the elder mr. bush has recently been released from a month-long stay in the hospital due to a respiratory ailment and so both bush families announced that they would not be able to attend because of the poor health of the eld
term starts with passing medicare, voting rights act, civil rights act just on the triumph of getting social welfare legislation through and here comes vietnam in 1965 overshadowing it all and everything turns and as you're listening to the tapes of these conversations and you hear the despair in his -- the growing despair in his voice as vietnam comes to overshadow everything he wanted to do and that he wanted to started to do in the second term. you see how a second term can go really bad. >> rose: what did he say "that bitch of a war stole --" >> the woman i love, the great society. >> rose: the challenge for a second term? >> well, the challenge i think often times is that a president who's had great reelections suddenly finds he has less power than he thought he had. franklin park zoo in -- franklin roosevelt in 1937, more democratic congress than in any time of the century suddenly realize that the supreme court can keep on overruling the things he gets passed through congress so he tries to pack the supreme court, slapped down, bad second term. in nixon's case-- and i think bob
: and look for an acknowledgement of dr. martin luther king's vision on the day we honor the civil rights leader, a coincidence of timing that's not lost on the nation's first african american president. now, the speech was finalized over the weekend, but the president often makes final word changes up to the very end, and this time was no exception. i'm told that he made tweaks this morning, in fact. the president, i'm told, will speak for under 20 minutes. by reading prior inaugural addresses, he decided the shorter, the better. his last address was just over 18 minutes. his favorite two past inaugurals were kennedy's, which ran just under 14 minutes, and, of course, lincoln's second, which at 700 words, had to be fewer than ten minutes. i'm told president obama had a quiet breakfast with the first lady and his daughters before going to church. anderson? >> let's talk about it with john king and gloria borger. what are you anticipating, john, hearing today? >> i think broad strokes. time to bring the country together. time to get through the tough economic times. i think it will be a ca
. and as it happened -- and i was involved in the civil rights movement when i was in my teens and 20s. i met dr. martin luther king jr. i was doing a play called fly black bird about the civil rights movement. i was a young student activist in that musical. and we sang at a civil rights rally where dr. king spoke. and after that, reca -- rally wa private meeting with dr. king, and i'll never forget that moment when i shook his hand. we are working >> good evening, americans, and welcome to "the ed show" from new york. any time republicans try to beat up on a clinton, it's always great tv, especially when they get whopped like they did today. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >> for me, this is not just a matter of policy, it's personal. >> secretary of state hillary clinton rips open the right wing attack on benghazi. >> the fact is we had four dead americans. >> and knocks down hack -- >> because of a protest or was it because of guys out for a walk one night decided they would go kill some americans. >> -- after hack -- >> what difference at this point does it make? it is our job to f
obama, "the bridge," talks about how he grew out of the civil rights movement, led by martin luther king. you write in the book, david, that race has been at the core of president obama's story. but it's not been in the foreground of his presidency. >> that's true. he's gotten some criticism for that from some bloack leaders. he views his presence in the white house is essential. and everything he can do, whether it's improving the economy or keeping the united states safe, improves the lives of all americans. he's very wary of being the president of black america. he's insistent on being the president of the united states. and sometimes, that's caused him difficulty with certain black leaders. cornell west is one. there's others. >> and you said the president blames his americanism. what did you mean by that? >> president obama is very clear, he has the opportunity to represent all of america. he realizes that that history helps him lead the entire country. and so, he's claimed his america is not simply as black america. >> i was just going to say. this is also the 150th anniversary her
. in a fundamental way, labor has to work with the kinds of folks we talked about here, civil rights, in a much more basic way than they have the last 80 years. it has to be like core, we're in this together. we're going to fight foreclosures as much as we're going to fight for bargaining rights. we're going to fight climate change as much as we're going to fight to raise the standard of living. it's going to take that kind of labor movement, and i think a lot of us are ripe for that kind of labor movement. >> last year, 2012, labor took a series of defeats right on the chin in wisconsin, michigan and other places. i think you wrote recently that 88% of the workers in this country do not have collective bargaining rights, and 12% who do are constantly fighting a defensive battle. how do you change that? is labor dying? >> i think -- well, the way we change that is that part of the agenda, the economic justice part that the democracy part goes with it, but on the economic justice front, part of it is to get the partners, which there are now, the greens, the civil rights, the students, the others, to
will lead us in the invocation. >> the farmer chair of the naacp, widow of slain civil rights leader edgar medgar evers 50 years ago this year. >> america, we are here, our nation's capital, on this day, january 21st, 2013, the inauguration of our 45th president, barack obama, we come at this time to ask blessings upon our leaders, the president, vice president, members of congress, all elected and appointed officials of the united states of america. we are here to ask blessings upon our armed forces; blessings upon all who contribute to the essence of the american spirit, the american dream, the opportunity to become whatever our mankind, womankind allows us to be. this is the promise of america as we sing the words of belief, this is my country, let us act upon the meaning that everyone is included. may the inherent dignity and inalienable rights of every woman, man, boy and girl be honored. may all your people, especially the least of these, flourish in our blessed nation. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation and 50 years after the march on washington, we celebrate the spirit o
to the left. >> as a civil rights issue of. >> that's right. he talked about global climate change and how we will attack that. immigration reform. by the way, there is jay-z and beyonce. >> by the way, she looks fantastic. >> moving on quickly. she is an incredibly beautiful woman. megyn: i defended him when he said it as well. [laughter] [talking over each other] >> i was just saying that i think both of you have points well taken. pillars in the eyes of the democrats and liberals of the american social progress in american society. he was also advancing some items which were not well established one can say he's the president, he got elected, he's got a mandate. but he wasn't saying that he was going to meet republican pathway. >> the president and the vice president with the official signing. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> thank you very much. [applause] megyn: we received about a dozen e-mails from our folks and viewers elaborating on what the crypt area is. it is called that because george washington was supposed to be buried there. but he was not because his fa
permitted to serve in combat roles and what's next for the u.s. military in term of equal rights and civil rights. the biggest issue is what role the military will have in defending the country at a time when our enemies are fragmented everywhere and it requires very well-educated people and i think the next big thing is in my view is universal service. we're not going to be able to defend the country of ten million people and we're an extremely small force and i don't care what the technology. i believe in universal service. >> a la israel or -- >> oh, yeah. it's going to require some logistical changes and it will require a great deal of leadership, but if you have a situation where you have more people in new york city than you had at pearl harbor and you have an all-volunteer force you're outsourcing our defense for a small number of brave young men and women. that's the next big equal opportunity. >> that's fascinating. kayla, very quickly. you're a published author now and an outspoken advocate. i've got to ask you, political future. are you thinking of running for something, maybe?
be there -- >> 70s? >> king would be there with all the other civil rights leaders who are in that moment. >> getting back to what you were saying, rachel, about the corporate profits, you know, the president believes in wall street. he doesn't want to be alien to wall street. he believes it is a vital part of our capitolistic system. he believes that government has a responsibility not to leave people behind and he also believes that those who have enjoyed the fruits out of our system should pay their fair share. and defining that fair share is going to be done by the population and the mood of the country and what we can do as a country to fix our finances. but he has been an allie to wall street. and he has tried to develop friends on wall street, which has been extremely hard for him, but if he can get these corporations to loosen up their profits and to hire people, then a lot of things would turn around in a heartbeat in this country. getting companies to invest here is one of his priorities. >> there's former president jimmy carter and his wife. immediately before them, as you migh
, the civil rights movement, to stonewall, the great inclusion of gay rights, the gay rights movement. those are critical. but we also have a political system that is too controlled by corporate power, and that is the fight of the 21st century. >> all right. katrina vanden heuvel. great to have you with us on the program tonight. >> thank you. >> thank you so much. remember, to answer tonight's question. share your thoughts with us on twitter at edshow and on facebook. we want to know what you think. >>> coming up, the aggressive agenda american support, it isn't going to amount to anything if we can't get a meaningful filibuster reform to take place in the senate. the latest developments with senator jeff merkley, who joins me next. stay with us. we understand. our financial advice is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings retirement advice. call or visit us online. we're ready to help. learn more with our free usaa retirement guide. call 877-242-usaa. >>>
. it is the right thing to do. in my view, this is a human rights issue of our times. like the civil rights issues of the 1960's. like the women's rights issues before it. it is of a fair and right thing to do is to pass comprehensive immigration reform, that provides a pathway to citizenship for individuals who are here, while also helping young people who were brought here at no fault of their own to be able to complete high school, going to college, serve in the military, and know that they can live and our country without fear of deportation. known as the dream act. and so, those are things that are very important to me. i know you said you are from texas. it is a very important issue. i will be serving on the homeland security committee and that committee has partial jurisdiction over immigration issues, particularly those pertaining to border security, ice, and customs, so we look forward to tackling that an upcoming session. host: representing nevada's fourth district as a democrat. tell us about the district it encompasses. guest: the nevada fourth district is the newest seat that we learn
democratic state senator henry marsh a lifelong civil rights advocate left town to attend president obama's inauguration yesterday, the g.o.p. took advantage using their one-day majority of 20-19 to pass new redistricting lines that would create more republican-dominated districts. but in an apparent peace offering, virginia republicans did honor martin luther king as they adjourned. i'm kidding. they actually honored confederate general stonewall jackson on dr. king's holiday. tasteful. joining me now from d.c. is political reporter joe williams. and here with me in new york is the only and only sam seder host of the majority report. thank you for your time tonight to discuss all of this malfeasance. joe, let me start with you because my head hurts over this. help me out here. 41 votes to maintain a filibuster instead of 60 to break it. is that the kind of reform harry reid has been promising month after month? >> basically it is change we can believe in if you're a senator because what they want is a rule that can benefit them when they're in the minority. and that is kind of a half mea
was a veteran of the civil rights fight. double crassness to do it on the fact he's out of town attending the inraugation of the first black president. lee jackson king day, i was there. doesn't surprise me at all. what happens is you don't have a state where the consequences have to be paid for these kind of actions. you don't have a significant voting block. virginia has flipped from blue to red on the local level. not a whole lot of pushback from the democrats on the voter side until they get punished for these kind of actions it will continue. >> john: joe williams and host of ring of fire and the majority report sam seder. love talking to both of you. thank you forget for coming on. >> yet another mass shooting this time in the gun friendly state of texas. my congratulations to wayne lapierrre and the nra coming up. >> john: there was another shooting at another school today. this time in texas. at lone star college. the shooter wounded three people one critically, despite being surrounded by good guys with guns. thankfully, no one was killed. this shooting like all of the others tha
. >> absolutely. the civil rights movement created the possibility for barack obama to become president and i think he's ever mindful of that. i think that's where that community organizing comes in him. he knows that communities create the power. you think about the gay rights movement, the civil rights movement, the women's movement, this is all part of who he is and i think it's part of american history. when i look at american history, those movements are critical in transforming our attitudes about ourselves and about one another. and that's where real change takes place. lincoln said, you control public sentiment, controls everything. even if they can't control my voice. >> sometimes when historians try to speak too much in the course of one inaugural weekend, this is what happens. we're going to allow doris rest her voice for a second. you saw when we were talking a motorcade and you'd be forgiven for thinking there's the president on the move from the white house. it was not. first of all, you can't swing a dead cat without hit ago motorcade this weekend in washington. that was just t
thurman whom hated the civil rights bill so much, mr. dixiecrt that he stood tup on the floor of the senate for 24 hours and 18 minutes before he had to pee and filibuster ended and they voted. but that was the filibuster. now, it's come into something that happens all the time, that is routine that one senate can do to block a measure from coming up a vote. first, they have a vote of whether or not they are going to proceed to a vote. you can filibuster that. you can filibuster the main event, and you don't have to do a filibuster. all you have to say is: i am filibustering this and sit in your office and watch t.v. and nothing happens. it is outrageous. it is undemocratic. it's the tierney of the minority. we talked about this for so long with senators who were determined that not just this term, but last term term before, but this term for sure with democrats having 55 votes, there is no reason why they couldn't fix it. and if i canning it meant either getting rid of the filibuster or making people actually filibuster or roll in cots so the
of the civil rights act and the voting changes that occurred then. but since then, we've heard no mention of the right to vote in this country being a protected right and the sanctity of that idea. i think the only thing -- first of all, we gotta remember, we vote every two years in this country. not every four. that needs to be the refrain from -- every time you talk about an election, anybody within the sound of my voice needs to -- when they talk about voting or any of those things or what's going to happen in the next election, you're not talking about 2016. you're talking about 2014. those often matter more so because that's when they sneak these folks through. that's when purple districts turn red because people are look the other way or are too busy. thanks for the call. appreciate it. we'll be back right after this. more of "the stephanie miller show". celebrating her mom's 90th birthday. >> she'll be back tomorrow though. >> she will. >> i'm sorry. that's inappropriate. >> announcer: it's "the stephanie miller show." desmond tutu said a quote that is one of my favorite quotes. "w
and you have a candidate who said i would do this day vote against the civil rights act. >> john: that was rand paul. i think rand paul is like rick santorum in that he's not running for president but for higher public speaking fees for the rest of his life. it will be hillary against chris christie, a new york senator against a new jersey governor. his views are opposite of most of america. we know over 70% favor abortion rights. chris christie does not. do you think people would realize even a guy they like can have policies they don't like or is charisma more important than ideology? >> is that a trick question? >> john: no, it's a very real question. look at george w. bush. >> we love charisma and we love politicians with swagger. he has done good things with new jersey. you drive through and it even smells better. >> john: who doubt, and who cannot cheer what he has done for sandy victims. >> and the police forces, they love him too. >> john: and we could use that tunnel to manhattan as well. >> to predict anything about what chris christie's bigger play is on the national s
filibuster is part of the tradition. how is that the -- >> part of the tradition of blocking civil rights legislation, right? it's not like -- it was a fairly effective method of blocking all sorts of legislation. >> that's true. >> i mean, at the same time, look, the republicans what they wanted most and they have claimed that the reason they filibuster everything is that harry reid hasn't allowed them to offer amendments. to your point about filling the amendment tree. they got what they wanted most. now harry reid will not be able to prevent them from offering amendments. he will have to let both sides offer two amendments medical record to move a bill past the first filibuster, and this isn't the filibuster. this is just to begin debate on an item. i mean, i think republicans ms instance got exactly the thing they wanted most. i'm not sure what democrats got. i agree with keeping the filibuster itself because democrats may need is one day, but i think more reform than this was warranted. >> we have no idea where 20141 going to happen. there are a lot of vulnerable democrats that will
. whether it's civil rights for african-americans or equality for women, or equality for the lgtb community. >> oh, my. he takes on the world and the internet in his new ebook, and he's going to join me live in the studio. you don't want to miss it. progresso this reduced sodium soup says it may help lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just have to eat it as part of your heart healthy diet. step 1. eat the soup. all those veggies and beans, that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. gives you 1% cash back on all purchases, plus a 50% annual bonus. and everyone likes 50% more... [ midwestern/chicago accent ] cheddar! yeah! 50 percent more [yodeling] yodel-ay-ee-oo. 50% more flash. [ southern accent ] 50 percent more taters. that's where tots come from. [ male announcer ] the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on every purchase plus a 50% annual bonus on the cash you earn. it's the card for people who like more cash. 50% more spy stuff. what's in your wallet? this car is too small. yeah. t
civil rights leader who is committed her life to extending the promise of our nation's founding principles to all americans. mrs. everies will lead us in the invocation. [cheering and applause] america, we are here, our nation's capitol, on this day january 21st, 2013. the inauguration of our 45th president, barack obama. we come at this time to ask blessings upon our leaders, the president, vice president, members of congress, all elected and appointed officials of the united states of america. we are here to ask blessings upon our armed forces, blessings upon all who contribute to the sense of the american spirit, the american dream. the opportunity to become whatever our mankind, woman kind, allows us to be. this is the promise of america. as we sing the world of belief, this is my country, let us act point meanings that everyone is included. may the inherit dignity and inailble rights of every woman, man, boy and girl be honored. may all your people, especially the least of these floorish in our blessed nation. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation and fifty years af
and -- muskee and stafford and chafee, giants in this body who stepped forward and civil rights, stepped forward on environmental issues, stepped forward on the pressing issues of the time. and so the senate once again in that time period passed laws. i remember i was a kid here in washington, my father was secretary of the interior, the wilderness law, clean water act, clean air act, we set up the environmental protection agency. i mean, these were big laws, big, bold laws that were dealing with our problem. so once again, glory days of the senate. and i -- i -- i think we have that potential as i see the new senators coming in, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too lo
, in the speech the president also broke ground by promising to push for expanded civil rights for gays and lesbians. aside from his health care reform law, this could be the greatest legacy, the biggest legacy of his time in office. a case that is now before the supreme court could force the administration into making new federal policy on this front. it could force the administration to decide whether federal benefits will be extended to same-sex couples in the next year, wolf. >> so now that he's laid out very specifically -- i was surprised how specific he went yesterday in the inaugural address, his priorities for the second term, i assume in his state of the union address in february that he he will go into details with more specifics. is that what you're hearing? >> reporter: yes, wolf. i was not surprised that he laid out sign posts about where he wanted to make progress. what he wasn't going to do in this speech was get into detail. so where he laid out markers on these major issues, we will now hear much more policy detail in the state of the union and the white house is sayin
with seneca falls and selma. these are all iconic moments in a series of civil rights movements. and they deserve to be listed together but are not always. so this was an amazing moment. you could hear the cheers from the people on the mall in the background. this is not just me talking. there was wide approval in the crowd, because the cheers were very loud. host: 1 happened at the stonewall inn? guest: stone wall is a gay bar in new york city. 1960's, policend raids were very common at gay bars throughout the united states, including in places like new york city. it may surprise people to know how common that was in the late 1960's. so there was a police raid on the stonewall inn, but this time instead of acquiescence by the patrons, people get arrested, people leave, this time people fought back. it
. >> and that was myrlie evers-williams in a moment she couldn't have imagined when her husband, civil rights leader, was slain 50 years ago. speaking at the inauguration, second inauguration of the first black president. quick commercial break. we'll come back with vice president biden taking the oath of office. it's a new day. if your a man with low testosterone, you should know that axiron is here. the only underarm treatment for low t. that's right, the one you apply to the underarm. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18. axiron can transfer to others through direct contact. women, especially those who are or who may become pregnant, and children should avoid contact where axiron is applied as unexpected signs of puberty in children or changes in body hair or increased acne in women may occur. report these signs and symptoms to your doctor if they occur. tell your doctor about all medical conditions and medications. do not use if you have prostate or breast cancer. serious side effects could include increased risk of prostate cancer; worsening prostate symptoms; decreased sper
history. the pioneers went over the rocky mountains. we got through world war ii. we did the civil rights movement. they did it, not we. i mean we that's the whole point. the civil rights movement the gay rights movement the womens movement came from below and leaders responded. it's never coming from the top down. usually change comes from the bottom up. that's where the we is. >> lincoln's second inaugural address was something like 701 words or something. i believe he used the word "i" once in the speech. so could a president these days give a 700-word inaugural address? please? >> we would love it. that means you have to have that poetic compression. linkeningen linkcoln was a writer that knew how to make these things little. we would have to talk more. oh my god. >> doris, let me ask you a question. i want to follow up on this but i want to make sure it's a fair thing to ask. that's the great they think about "morning joe." >> uh-oh. here he goes. >> the great thing about "morning joe" is -- >> what are you doing? >> we fly without -- >> are you thinking? >> we ign
engagement is the essential in protecting our citizens from harm, against civil-rights violations and combating guns, gangss and drugs through violence that steel too many promising futures. you understand exactly what it is that we are up against not only because you hear the alarming statistics in news stories but because you see it firsthand on a daily basis. most importantly you recognize as i do -- all right? most importantly you recognize as i do that no public safety challenge can be understood in isolation and none of us can make the progress we need and secure the result our communities deserve on our own. that is particularly true about gun violence, an issue that in one way or another has touched every city and every count represented here and about which many of you have been passionate advocates. on a number of occasions the leaders in this room have joined with those of us in the justice department who support what enforcement and strengthen anti violence initiatives especially in recent years as our nation has come together in the wake of last month's horse events i
passage of the historic civil rights laws. we are honored to have with us a colleague, congressman john lewis, a speaker at that historic march. [applause] ongressman lewis' life exemplifies the courage and sacrifice that has made our nation great. please stand and take about what so we can all recognize you. [applause] -- take a bow so that we can all srecognize you. behind us, the painting we have chosen for this luncheon is at niagara falls. 6.is was painted in 1850 sike for me, niagara falls never fails to inspire a tremendous all of the natural beauty of our country. then and now, the mighty falls symbolize the grandeur, power, and possibility of america. i want to thank my former senate partner, hillary clinton for allowing us to borrow this beautiful painting from the state department collection. [applause] but frankly, we are not here for the paintings, we are here for the food. while the theme of today's ceremony is based in america's future, today's menu could be labeled face in america's food. from the new england lobster, to the south dakota bison, to the wonderful new york
-- we had desegregation in the military in 1948. the civil rights act was passed in 196. equal pay for men and women in decades. something the society still can't claim to have. this is not about set asides or quotas but saying we will open the field for those who are capable of filling it in. in no way does it endanger national security if you have people who are qualified to serve in those roles. >> do you think there were opportunities you missed out on because of a policy like this and other women, the opportunities missed out on whether pro-potion motions or advancement? give us an idea how much women have been missing out on. >> a young woman came through boot camp with me and she signed up literally to fight. she was assigned to be a baker in the mess hall. she cried her eyes out for days because she wasn't going to serve on the front lines. i met every physical, emotional and mental challenge to serve on the front line but i'm 4'11" and i need an ammo box to shoot out of the fox hole. i don't belong on the front line. but the women who do meet those standards, it ought to b
accomplish a lot. >> absolutely. look at what eisenhower did. he dealt with little rock and civil rights. ike created nasa created anwar de demilitarized antarctica. and bill clinton, what would he have been without a second term. he's able to go around and talk about surplus because he had a second term. ronald reagan. i'm tire of hearing about iran-contra. diplomacy with gorbachev was a big deal. >> so you're not worried about the second term. >> not only am i not, the president can't be. >> make sure his team is focused the agenda and getting things >>> good morning. sun and clouds around today. it's going on a chilly one, but not as cold as four years ago. 34 now in town. 28 across the bay. good looking day today. inauguration day. sunshine, some clouds, breezy, chilly, some late afternoon flurries and snow >>> there's a record number of women in the new congress however, they are still far outnumbered by the men. we'll ask three female senators just why they think that is ahead on "cbs this morning" from washington. we'll be right back. thn this morning's "
and poverty every much as civil rights. but in this speech this president addressed militarism, beautifully, and we believe in enduring security and peace does not mean perpetual war. he spoke about poverty beautifully without ever actually using the word, but talking about we are not a nation of takers, and the fact that he would use the word stone wall and he wasn't referring to a dead general, i was floored. i feel comfortable saying that i think dr. king would have been very proud and impressed with today's speech. >> jennifer: i'm glad to here that. totally agree. we're going to take a break and bring you more analysis of the krer moanny. [ rosa ] i'm rosa and i quit smoking with chantix. when the doctor told me that i could smoke for the first week... i'm like...yeah, ok... little did i know that one week later i wasn't smoking. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or aft
. it was the only time that they could have a 20-19 vote. >> john: exactly. they did it because of a civil rights veteran in the virginia legislature who went to d.c. anyone in the media address this? even when the republican governor of the state said it was wrong, how were they able to do this on martin luther king day? itit was a holiday. weren't they closed? >> there hasn't been any conversation about how procedurally they were able to get that done. >> john: many think it wasn't legal. it will be challenged in the courts. it might be because virginia doesn't take dr. king's birthday holiday seriously. i don't know if you know this but i spent a lot of time there. my mom's from virginia. i have a lot of family there. >> i'm from virginia. >> you know it's not martin luther king. it is jackson -- they honor two confederate generals and this other fella. >> wow. cognitive dissidence. >> some republicans are backing away from it. >> and legislation hasn't passed on holidays before. there is no law saying you can't pass legislation on holidays. >> john: it is shady. to me, it seems like -- >> it
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)